Art Title

$1999.00

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About the Artist

While wood and bronze have frequently been presented side by side in sculpture, J. Christopher White has done a stunning job of blending the two into a new medium, which he calls a "Bronzewood Meld".  The transition point between wood and bronze is nearly imperceptible, due to his ability to take the wood deep into the bronze sculpture, combined with the skill of the patineur to reproduce the weathered grays of the wood.  White’s tasteful use of high polish and contrasting rugged grays builds a platform to launch the illusion of bronze turning into wood.  The result is a sculpture with the durability and repeatability of bronze, and the warmth and one of a kind uniqueness of wood, combining the best of both mediums and the added intrigue of having your eye fooled. A longtime wood carver, White’s bronzewood melds embody the movement he is known for. His use of S-curves, negative spaces, and fluid lines into shimmering ribbons of wood have broken the mold. Each piece requires the welcome challenge of obtaining the wood. Often weeks of hunting the canyon ledges for just the right shape is involved. Cutting and removing these aged relics usually requires rappelling or dangerous descents and ascents, and always a lot of challenging work and prayer.  Even in selecting the wood, great attention is given to movement. Every line and plane have a function in the design and draws the eye around, through or ultimately to the focal point of the sculpture. Some forms and lines provide environment for the subject, others give illusions of speed, grace or movement. White’s studies in Wildlife Biology at Texas Tech University (Lubbock, Texas) and five years of studying human anatomy at the National Institute of Fine Arts (San Miguel de Allende, Guanajato) in Mexico are both evidenced in his portfolio of birds, fish, mammals and moving depictions of men, women and children. His signature style of realism flowing into stylized forms and ultimately abstract bands of fluid movement has continually won him top honors at national and international competitions. Chris currently resides in Loveland, Colorado with his wife Sharlane. Although a Colorado resident, he still travels to Texas several times a year to collect wood.